University of Minnesota
Department of Sociology
soc@umn.edu
612-624-4300


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Lisa Sun-Hee Park

Protrait: Lisa Sun-Hee Park

Professor
Ph.D. 1998 Northwestern University
Room 1035 Social Sciences
Phone: 612-624-8563
Email: lspark@umn.edu

Curriculum Vitae

Interest Areas

Immigration and Welfare Policy; Immigrant Health Care; Race, Class, and Gender; Asian American Studies; Environmental Justice; Urban Theory and Methods.

Current Research

Prof. Park’s research primarily focuses on U.S. migration in two, related ways.  First, Park is interested in the social location of immigrants and how their experiences coincide and conflict with larger national ideologies and histories. Second, she is concerned with how immigration politics functions within the context of neoliberalism to endorse the retrenchment of public goods, services, and space.  Given these questions, she approaches migration from an interdisciplinary and comparative perspective that centers issues of gender, race, class and nation. Her publications delve into these issues from multiple vantage points including environmental justice concerns among immigrant women workers in Silicon Valley, social citizenship struggles among second generation Asian Americans, health care advocacy for low-income pregnant immigrant women, and nativist environmental movements in Colorado.  Prof. Park is currently in the early stages of two new projects: 1) immigration health care after the Affordable Care Act. 2) contemporary politics and application of public charge policy, and 3) a comparative study on the interaction of immigration politics and refuge policy.  Prof. Park is also the director of the Asian American Studies Program at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities.

Selected Publications

Book Cover: Entitled to Nothing

Entitled to Nothing: The Struggle for Immigrant Health Care in the Age of Welfare Reform. 2011. New York University Press.

The Slums of Aspen: Immigrants vs. the Environment in America’s Eden. 2011. Co-authored with D. N. Pellow. New York University Press.

Continuing Significance of the Model Minority Myth: The Second Generation.” 2008. SocialJustice 35(2):134-144.

Consuming Citizenship: Children of Asian Immigrant Entrepreneurs. 2005. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press.

Silicon Valley of Dreams: Immigrant Labor, Environmental Injustice, and the High Tech Global Economy. 2002. Co-authored with D.N. Pellow. New York: New York University Press.