University of Minnesota
Department of Sociology
soc@umn.edu
612-624-4300


Department of Sociology's home page.

Erin Kelly

Protrait: Erin Kelly

Professor & Life Course Center Director
Ph.D. 2000 Princeton University
Room 1014 Social Sciences
Phone: 612-624-0228
Email: kelly101@umn.edu

Curriculum Vitae

Flexible Work and Well-Being Study

Interest Areas

Organizations and Work; Gender; Family and Life Course; Law and Social Policy.

Current Research

Prof. Kelly studies changes in U.S. workplaces and their effects on employees, families, and organizations. She is principal investigator, with Phyllis Moen, of the Flexible Work and Well-Being Center, part of the Work, Family, and Health Network funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control. Click here for more information.

Prof. Kelly has investigated flexibility initiatives, non-compliance with the Family and Medical Leave Act, sexual harassment policies, and employer-sponsored child care benefits, as well as the effects of diversity policies on the representation of white women and African-Americans in managerial positions.

Selected Publications

Changing Work and Work-Family Conflict: Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network.” With Phyllis Moen, Wen Fan, et al. 2014. American Sociological Review, June 2014.

Redesigning, Redefining Work.” With Shelley Correll, et al. 2014. Work & Occupation, 41(1) 3-17.

Toward a Model of Work Redesign for Better Work and Better Life.” With Leslie Perlow. 2014. Work & Occupations, 41(1) 111-134.

Relieving the Time Squeeze? Effects of a White-Collar Workplace Change on Parents.” With Rachelle Hill, Eric Tranby, and Phyllis Moen. 2013. Journal of Marriage and Family, 5: 1014-1029.

Healthy Work Revisited: Do Changes in Time Strian Predict Well-Being?
With Phyllis Moen and Jack Lam. 2013. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 18(2), 157-72.

Changing Workplaces to Reduce Work-Family Conflict: Schedule Control in a White-Collar Organization” with Phyllis Moen and Eric Tranby. 2011. American Sociological Review, 76:2, 265-90.