University of Minnesota
Department of Sociology
soc@umn.edu
612-624-4300


Department of Sociology's home page.

Joseph Gerteis

Protrait: Joseph Gerteis

Associate Professor
Ph.D. 1999, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Room 1125 Social Sciences
Phone: 612-624-1615
Email: gerte004@umn.edu

Curriculum Vitae

Interest Areas

Historical Sociology; Politics and Social Movements; Social Theory; Diversity and Solidarity in American Society.

Current Research

Prof. Gerteis is interested in the dynamics of difference and solidarity and how these play into the formation of group boundaries, interests, and identities. He is currently exploring how Americans think about both the benefits and costs of diversity, as well as how claims about American national identity often involve racial and religious exclusions. His recent work has involved a book on interracial labor movements of the late 19th century and papers from the American Mosaic Project exploring how Americans think about issues of diversity and solidarity in modern America through the lenses of race and religion. 

Selected Publications

Classical Sociological Theory and Contemporary Sociological Theory, edited with Craig Calhoun, James Moody, Steven Pfaff, and Indermohan Virk. 2012. 3rd ed. Oxford, UK: John Wiley & Sons.

"Ethnic Community and Ethnic Boundaries in a 'Sauce Scented Neighborhood'" with Jon Smajda. 2012. Social Forces 27(3):617-640.

"An Empirical Assessment of Whiteness Theory: Hidden from How Many?" with Doug Hartmann and Paul Croll. 2009. Social Problems, 56 (3): 403-424.

Book Cover: Class and the Color Line

Class and the Color Line: Interracial Class Coalition in the Knights of Labor and the Populist Movement. 2007. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

"Atheists as 'Other': Moral Boundaries and Cultural Membership in American Society," with Penny Edgell and Douglas Hartmann. 2006. American Sociological Review 71 (2): 211-234.

"Dealing with Diversity: Mapping Multiculturalism in Sociological Terms," with Douglas Hartmann. 2005. Sociological Theory, 23 (2): 218-240.